Latest Event Updates

CCNA Voice Summary – Part 5

Posted on Updated on


;

Voice over IP

VOIP process: Sample analog Voice or Video ->; Encode to digital value ->; transmission in an IP data payload

Uses Signaling Protocol for setup and control of the call and a Media Protocol for the payload. They are transmitted separately.

Signaling is typically sent using TCP (connection oriented) because it is important that the other side gets all the signaling information.

After successful negotiation using a signaling protocol, the Media protocol takes over. Media protocol samples the voice/video using a codec and is sent over UDP (connectionless). Why UDP? – If voice does not get to the other side, is not very critical since we are sampling at a very high rate. Packet loss is not as critical as Packet delay.

The Voice gateway provides translation between different VoIP networks or VoIP and non-VoIP networks such as the PSTN. They also provide physical access for local analog and digital voice devices

VoIP trunks

  • easy to configure
  • Cost per line is less
  • Lower long distance rates
  • Data can utilize voice bandwidth when there is no voice
  • Usually SIP based

Cisco Unified Border Element (Cisco Multiservice IP-to-IP Gateway)

  • Demarcation point between two VoIP networks
  • Terminates and reoriginates both signaling and RTP/RTCP streams
  • Can interconnect VoIP networks using different signaling protocols
  • Provides NAT, Billing, CDR, QoS and media interworking.

Call Control Models:

Distributed – Each router is independent. Reduced scalability.

Centralized – Server / Client Model. Call Manager has all the intelligence. Simple model. Drawback – redundancy.

Design Models:

Campus (Single Site) – All Call Managers in one location. Usually uses the same single high bandwidth uncompressed codec. All application services are centrally connected. Connected to the PSTN and WAN. WAN is usually used for backup or connection to ITSP.

Central Site – all call processing agents in one single site. Can have connections to the remote office and the telecommuter via the WAN. You can also have a backup connection over the PSTN. Advantage TEHO – toll bypass. Remote routers can use SRST in case the central site is unavailable.

Distributed, Multi-cluster – sites are independent and with call processing. More expensive since we have to supply a full call processing model for each site.

CODEC – Compressor /Decompressor

A codec is a software algorithm that compresses and decompresses speech or audio signals.

Compressor IS used in the transmit direction / Decompressor is used in the Rx direction.

Codec is carried in the Media stream (RTP).

Examples:

G.711 – ITU standard. Uses Pulse Code Modulation PCM (64KBS). Excellent audio. Typically used on LANS

G.722 – ITU standard. 64kbs. has been optimized for wideband speech. Sampling a wider spectrum of audio speech hence better audio quality than G.711

G.729 – Used for WAN connections. 8kbps. high complexity for CPU /DSP (for sampling audio). High complexity requires more chips/DSP channels to compress or decompress voice

g.729a – medium complexity cup/DSP

g.729b – high complexity codec. Added VAD (voice activity connection).added CNG (comfort voice generation). Most people disable g729b

iLBC – internet low bit rate codec. optimized for narrow band speech. 13.3kbps. originally designed by Skype and intended for the internet (lossy wan connections)

ISAC – internet speech audio codec. variable rate codec (ranges from 10 -32 kbps). it’s adaptive. optimized for wideband speech and jitter over WAN e.g. internet

Digital Signal Processors (DSPs).

DSPs Convert analog to digital and vice versa. They:

sample the analog voice ->; quantization of the sampled data ->;encode and packetize ->; optionally compress.

Packet Data Voice Modules (PVDMs)

This is cisco proprietary DSPs. Used in IP phones, VOIP gateways for voice termination, DSP Farms (DSPs grouped together) for conferencing and media termination point MTP or for Transcoding.

MTP terminates the media.

conferencing – mix together various audio/ video streams into one.

transcoder – change one codec into another. can also change the size of packets.

Streaming Protocols:

E.g RTP and RTCP.

Real Time Protocol.
RTP

Layer 4 protocol. encapsulates all delay sensitive traffic such as voice. Rides on top of UDP. UDP Ports 16384 – 32767.

Provides end-to-end network transport functions for delay senitive traffic

  • payload type identification
  • sequence numbering
  • time stamping
  • delivery monitoring

Real Time Control Protocol. Monitors quality and statistics for the RTP protocol. Uses a +1 port from the port used by RTP. RTP uses and odd port, RTCP uses even ports.

  • RTCP provides
  • session monitoring
  • session control
  • packet count, loss, delay, jitter

sRTCP – used for security. voice data payload is encrypted using the AES cipher using transport layer security TLS aka SSL v3.1. it does not encrypt the entire packet as IPsec does.

Encapsulation process:

Voice Payload ->; RTP Header ->; UDP header ->; Layer 3 IP header ->; Layer 2 .

Signaling Protocols:

Used to setup, teardown and control info about the call. Used for supplementary services like Call forward, pickup, transfer, hold, busy, redirect, call park, presence, Message waiting indicator MWI etc.

Most common: h323 – ITU ,sip – IETF ,MGCP – IETF, SCCP.

H323

Evolved from ISDN Q931 layer 3 signaling .

Peer to peer protocols (phones and gateways have independent dial plans and are intelligent. they do not have to have a server in order to tell them what to do. they do not have to register to anyone but they have the ability to register to a gatekeeper so as to centralize dial plans.

SIP – Session Initiation protocol

Also a peer to peer protocol. Endpoints are intelligent and can make call routing decisions. They can register to a SIP Registrar server. it derives a lot of its roots from email SMTP.

MGCP

MGCP- media gateway control protocol. designed for IP network to PSTN network voice gateways. from a TDM signaling protocol e.g. PRI to the IP network. it is a client/server (master /slave)protocol. gateway cannot at independently. client endpoints are not intelligent. clients/ slaves must register with the server.

SCCP – Skinny call control protocol.

Designed by Selsius systems who built call manager. SCCP was based on h323. h323 was too fat and had too many messages thus the skinner protocol.

Cisco proprietary. used for cisco devices e.g. IP phones, analog gateways, voice ports(unity and unity connection ) and gateways. skinny uses h225. it has q921 in its header messages.

;

CCNA Voice Summary – Part 4

Posted on Updated on


Circuit Switched Network

Involves 2 nodes that establish a dedicated circuit in order to communicate. The channel remains up during the whole conversation. PSTN is the largest Circuit switched network in the world. The PSTN uses SS7 signaling.

Advantages: Dedicated Channel; Excellent quality; delay and bit rate is constant

Disadvantages: Not always enough available channels; bitrate is limited – there is little chance for newer technologies to increase the sound quality; To enable Video, we need to bond channels together. e.g. h.320

 Packet Switched Network

Digital network that transmits data into packets irrespective of the data. Layer 3 devices encapsulate the data into layer 2 frames. Each device makes decisions for the packet independent of the previous device. Good Example is the Internet

Advantages: Constant bitrate; newer technology can improve sound, Easier to increase bandwidth for features. QoS overcomes all disadvantages

Disadvantages: No dedicated connection; Packet loss; Not always enough available bandwidth but can be added; Packet delay – latency; Jitter – delay variance.
Voice Packet Requirements

  • smooth bandwidth demand
  • minimal impact on other traffic
  • Small packets (60 – 200 bytes)
  • Delay intolerant
  • drop intollerant
  • UDP priority

Data Packet Requirements

  • varied bandwidth demand
  • can tolerate some delay
  • can tolerate high drop rates
  • use TCP for retransmission

Video Packet Requirements

  • bursty and greedy for bandwidth
  • impacts other traffic
  • Delay intolerant
  • drop intollerant
  • UDP priority

Unified Communication Networks

Everything flows over the same network as standard data. QoS keeps UC packets prioritized. They Include: Voice Calls, Conferences. VoiceMail, Presence and IM, Directory Services and phone based applications

 Public Providers

UCSystems can connect to both the old PSTN network and the Newer VoIP Network (SIP, H323, and ITSP – Internet Service Provider).

CCNA Voice Summary – Part 3

Posted on Updated on


Digital Connectivity

Problems with Analog connectivity:

  • Distance limitation – regeneration of the signal also leads to regeneration of the white noise
  • Wiring requirements – Analog requires a tip and ring wire for each call – that makes it 2 wires for each call.

These problems are overcome by digital signals. Digital signals converts the signals into zeros and ones. You can therefore go over any distance and can send the digital strings over one wire

Digitizing Voice

This process follows the Nyguist Theory which states – if you can sample over twice the highest frequency, you can accurately reconstruct a signal digitally. Nyguist theory samples between 300 – 4000 Hz. Human speech ranges between 200 – 9000 Hz. The Human ear can hear between 20 – 20000 Hz.

After sampling the signal. We perform Quantization of the sample. It involves taking the value of the amplitude of the analog signal and line it up to a specific value. This process is known as the Pulse Amplitude Modulation. Using PAM we take more samples at the lower levels since most of the human voice is close to the zero scale.

After Quantization comes Coding – change the value to binary numbers. This is referred to as Pulse Code Modulation PCM. There are 2 PCM methods (a-law and mu- law). Mu-law is used in the USA, Japan and Canada.

A-law is used in the rest of the world. It uses the first code value to represent positive or negative value. 0 – negative; 1- positive. Next 3 binary digits represent the segments. More samples are taken at the lower segments.. The next 4 values is the interval between the values in a given segment.

Mu-law; 0 – positive; 1 – negative. It Is the direct opposite of a-law.

To communicate between the two laws, we need to convert between the two standards.

After coding, we can optionally compress the samples. 8000 samples. Each sample is converted into 8 bits = 64000 bits per second per voice call. Compression saves on bandwidth.

During compression, you can choose to send just the changes between the sample or build a code book for each sample. G.729 consumes 8 kbps

Digital Voice Circuits

Carries information in channels: Bearer and Data Channels. Bearer – carries the voice sample, Data Channel – call control and signaling.

Types of Digital Circuits: Channel Associated Signaling (CAS) and Common Channel Signaling (CCS). CAS – voice and data are transported in the same channel (Robbed Bit signaling). CAS example T1/E1. CCS – the only thing in the bearer channel is the actual voice. there is a dedicated channel for signaling. CCS example T1 OR E1 ISDN PRI/BRI.

TDM is used in all circuits. Voice is sampled then divided and interwoven together.

BRI – 2bearer channels + 1data

;

CCNA Voice Summary – Part 2

Posted on Updated on


Analog Connectivity

Analog transmission – using some property of the transmission media to convey a signal. As you speak into an analog phone, the voice is converted into electricity. Analog transmission uses the properties of electricity to transmit signals.

 Analog signaling:

Loop start.

The phone has 2 connections – tip and ring. When the phone is off hook, the loop is connected and the signal passes through the circuit. Suitable for home use. When we have higher call volumes, this signaling would lead to glare. Glare – when you pick up the phone and you are bridged to the wrong incoming call.

Ground start

When the receiver is off hook, the phone shoots a ground signal grounds the ring wire temporarily hence receives a dial tone. Usually used for businesses.

 

Signaling types – supervisor signaling, informational and address signaling.

Supervisor signaling: used to send on hook, off hook and ringing. Ringing is sent using AC current instead of DC. DC current usually has to be looped back to the sending end. The AC does not require it to send back a signal.

Informational signaling – conveys information while you are on the phone. It is used to send dial tone, busy, ring back, congestion, reorder, receiver off hook, no such number and confirmation. These are electric signals that are being sent.

Address signaling – signals dialed digits. Types of Analog signaling – Pulse and DTMF Dual Tone Multi frequency.

Pulse –

DTMF – Each digit on the phone is assigned 2 frequencies to distinguish between the two.

Analog Voice Circuits

FXS – Foreign Exchange Station: Uses 2 wires (tip and ring) in an RJ-11 Port. Connects to the analog phones, Fax and FXO port. Provides power for the analog device and -48 V for ringing, voice progress tones and dial tone.

FXO – Foreign Exchange Office: Uses 2 wires (tip and ring) in an RJ-11 Port. Connects to the CO. Provides supervised disconnect and supports caller Id.

E&M (Earth and Magnet / Ear and Mouth): Uses 4 wires (the middle 2 are tip and ring, the outer ones are E&M that use out of band signaling). Connects to Tie line to PBX, Paging and MoH source.

CCNA Voice Summary – Part 1

Posted on Updated on


Introduction to VoIP

Why Use VOIP

Cost Savings: reduced wiring – one single cable for both phone and computer; reduced telecommuter costs since they connect to the HQ via internet; Free long distance between branches and HQ; Single inbox for voicemail, fax and email using unity connection; Saves office space using extension mobility; Open architecture – the use of standard compliant protocols.

Why Use WAN connection over PSTN Connection: Bandwidth compression over WAN; Free long distance; Get rid of the tie lies- get rid of the monthly cost.

How to Move to VOIP

New companies start VoIP systems from scratch. Older companies go in 2 phases: Phase 1 – Keep the old internal network but re-equip the voice gateways that will connect to the WAN and the PSTN; Phase 2 – Get rid of all the PBX systems and use end to end VoIP.

Traditional PBX (Post Branch Exchange)

This was a way of privatizing a company from the Central Office. It emulates the Central Office. It is divided into 2 sides: The Line/ Station side connects to the phones; The Trunk side connects to the Local PSTN, Central office or another PBX through tie-trunks. Everything in a PBX flows through a Time Division Multiplexing- TDM backplane. This causes a blocked architecture in PBXs whereby we cannot have all the phones in a large PBX site talking at the same time since there isn’t enough bandwidth.

Disadvantages of PBX Architecture

  • Dedicated separate lines for voice in PBX.
  • TDM Backplane caused congestion at peaks hours
  • Not enough channels for all phones attached to make a call.

Free NTP servers

Posted on Updated on


ntp server ntp.psn.ru
ntp server time.nist.gov
ntp server time.windows.com
ntp server ntp1.imvp.ru
ntp server ntp0.fau.de

Troubleshooting MPLS

Posted on Updated on


So today I got a complaint from one of the customers, what is wrong with the MPLS link? The services are very slow….So here are just a few commands you can use to find out what is happening.

Perhaps there is a log Error

G00-7800-01#sh log
Syslog logging: enabled (11 messages dropped, 1 messages rate-limited,
0 flushes, 0 overruns, xml disabled, filtering disabled)

No Active Message Discriminator.

No Inactive Message Discriminator.
Console logging: level debugging, 93 messages logged, xml disabled,
filtering disabled
Monitor logging: level debugging, 0 messages logged, xml disabled,
filtering disabled
Buffer logging: level warnings, 9 messages logged, xml disabled,
filtering disabled
Logging Exception size (4096 bytes)
Count and timestamp logging messages: disabled

No active filter modules.

Trap logging: level informational, 98 message lines logged
Logging to 10.10.10.42 (udp port 514, audit disabled,
authentication disabled, encryption disabled, link up),
98 message lines logged,
0 message lines rate-limited,
0 message lines dropped-by-MD,
xml disabled, sequence number disabled
filtering disabled
Logging to 10.78.0.13 (udp port 514, audit disabled,
authentication disabled, encryption disabled, link up),
98 message lines logged,
0 message lines rate-limited,
0 message lines dropped-by-MD,
xml disabled, sequence number disabled
filtering disabled
Logging to 10.0.129.172 (udp port 514, audit disabled,
authentication disabled, encryption disabled, link up),
98 message lines logged,
0 message lines rate-limited,
0 message lines dropped-by-MD,
xml disabled, sequence number disabled
filtering disabled

Log Buffer (51200 bytes):

*Sep 5 17:31:36.871: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface FastEthernet0/0, changed state to up
*Sep 5 17:31:36.871: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface FastEthernet0/1, changed state to up
*Sep 5 17:31:36.871: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Special-Services-Engine1/0, changed state to up
Sep 11 11:53:42.249: %BGP-3-NOTIFICATION: received from neighbor 10.129.78.10 4/0 (hold time expired) 0 bytes
Sep 15 21:18:08.768: %BGP-3-NOTIFICATION: sent to neighbor 10.78.239.252 4/0 (hold time expired) 0 bytes
Sep 16 10:10:52.235: %BGP-3-NOTIFICATION: sent to neighbor 10.78.239.252 4/0 (hold time expired) 0 bytes
Sep 21 15:10:35.881: %BGP-3-NOTIFICATION: sent to neighbor 10.78.239.252 4/0 (hold time expired) 0 bytes
Sep 21 15:30:42.604: %BGP-3-NOTIFICATION: sent to neighbor 10.78.239.252 4/0 (hold time expired) 0 bytes
Sep 25 08:26:36.959: %BGP-3-NOTIFICATION: sent to neighbor 10.129.78.10 4/0 (hold time expired) 0 bytes

In my case, there seems to be nothing wrong. The Link is up. The last time the link was down was on the 25th. Next, who are the top talkers

G00-7800-01#sh ip flow top-talkers

SrcIf SrcIPaddress DstIf DstIPaddress Pr SrcP DstP Pkts
Tu200 10.2.0.251 Fa0/1.127* 10.78.2.130 06 1F4E 051C 53K
Tu200 10.2.0.251 Fa0/1.127 10.78.2.130 06 1F4E 051C 53K
Fa0/1.127 10.78.2.130 Tu200* 10.2.0.251 06 051C 1F4E 30K
Fa0/1.127 10.78.2.130 Tu200 10.2.0.251 06 051C 1F4E 30K
Tu200 10.2.0.251 Fa0/1.127* 10.78.0.204 06 1F4E 054F 29K
Tu200 10.2.0.251 Fa0/1.127 10.78.0.204 06 1F4E 054F 29K
Tu200 10.63.0.251 Fa0/1.127 10.78.0.197 06 1F4E 05AA 17K
Tu200 10.63.0.251 Fa0/1.127* 10.78.0.197 06 1F4E 05AA 17K
Tu200 10.1.5.12 Fa0/1.127 10.78.0.13 06 0016 6E0E 17K
Tu200 10.1.5.12 Fa0/1.127* 10.78.0.13 06 0016 6E0E 17K
10 of 10 top talkers shown. 604 flows processed.

Check the CPU Processes

G00-7800-01# sh processes cpu
CPU utilization for five seconds: 29%/27%; one minute: 29%; five minutes: 25%
PID Runtime(ms) Invoked uSecs 5Sec 1Min 5Min TTY Process
1 205088 370412 553 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Chunk Manager
2 55024 441836 124 0.08% 0.05% 0.06% 0 Load Meter
4 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 EDDRI_MAIN
5 3318216 275219 12056 0.16% 0.12% 0.12% 0 Check heaps
6 1528 1811 843 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Pool Manager
7 0 2 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Timers
8 64 36821 1 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 IPC Dynamic Cach
9 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 IPC Zone Manager
10 4496 2208916 2 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 IPC Periodic Tim
11 3388 2208915 1 0.08% 0.00% 0.00% 0 IPC Deferred Por
12 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 IPC Seat Manager
13 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 IPC BackPressure
14 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 OIR Handler
15 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Crash writer
16 2436 73640 33 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Environmental mo
17 64124 159281 402 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 ARP Input
18 7784 2303964 3 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 ARP Background
19 0 2 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 ATM Idle Timer
20 0 3 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 AAA high-capacit
21 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 AAA_SERVER_DEADT
22 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Policy Manager
23 0 2 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 DDR Timers
24 4 2 2000 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Entity MIB API
25 12 56 214 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 EEM ED Syslog
26 4136 660916 6 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 HC Counter Timer

Another helpfull command

G00-7800-01# show ip cache flow
IP packet size distribution (1079M total packets):
1-32 64 96 128 160 192 224 256 288 320 352 384 416 448 480
.000 .467 .030 .027 .102 .031 .067 .007 .005 .004 .008 .003 .002 .001 .003

512 544 576 1024 1536 2048 2560 3072 3584 4096 4608
.002 .001 .052 .014 .164 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000

IP Flow Switching Cache, 278544 bytes
673 active, 3423 inactive, 61352192 added
896261273 ager polls, 0 flow alloc failures
Active flows timeout in 30 minutes
Inactive flows timeout in 15 seconds
IP Sub Flow Cache, 50376 bytes
667 active, 1381 inactive, 60910634 added, 60910634 added to flow
0 alloc failures, 793 force free
2 chunks, 626 chunks added
last clearing of statistics never
Protocol Total Flows Packets Bytes Packets Active(Sec) Idle(Sec)
——– Flows /Sec /Flow /Pkt /Sec /Flow /Flow
TCP-Telnet 1146 0.0 19 88 0.0 6.1 9.1
TCP-FTP 458 0.0 9 48 0.0 1.5 4.5
TCP-FTPD 218 0.0 2917 594 0.2 17.5 1.8
TCP-WWW 891290 0.4 35 668 14.2 1.9 5.7
TCP-SMTP 39193 0.0 272 778 4.8 11.3 3.0
TCP-X 40 0.0 10 146 0.0 0.4 5.1
TCP-BGP 54530 0.0 1 49 0.0 2.7 15.6
TCP-Frag 1302 0.0 1 113 0.0 0.0 15.5
TCP-other 43644130 19.7 20 375 396.9 2.3 10.7
UDP-DNS 4657500 2.1 1 64 2.1 0.1 15.5
UDP-NTP 167134 0.0 1 78 0.0 0.0 15.4
UDP-TFTP 96 0.0 1 63 0.0 1.3 15.4
UDP-Frag 4262 0.0 1 92 0.0 1.8 15.4
UDP-other 8872913 4.0 16 92 67.2 1.4 15.5
ICMP 2755772 1.2 2 127 2.5 1.2 15.4
GRE 1552 0.0 212 781 0.1 18.2 15.5
IP-other 10 0.0 41555 621 0.1 18.5 15.5
Total: 61091546 27.6 17 347 488.6 2.0 11.9

Next, Check the MPLS Link. I have no drops – so the link seems fine.

G00-7800-01#sh policy-map int fa0/0 out
FastEthernet0/0

Service-policy output: OutVPN10MParent

Class-map: class-default (match-any)
119049004 packets, 44505653563 bytes
5 minute offered rate 1738000 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: any
Traffic Shaping
Target/Average Byte Sustain Excess Interval Increment
Rate Limit bits/int bits/int (ms) (bytes)
10000000/10000000 62500 250000 250000 25 31250

Adapt Queue Packets Bytes Packets Bytes Shaping
Active Depth Delayed Delayed Active
– 0 119049012 1555980705 1123276 1301408861 no

Service-policy : OutVPN10M

Class-map: VoIP (match-all)
0 packets, 0 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: ip precedence 5
Queueing
Strict Priority
Output Queue: Conversation 264
Bandwidth 640 (kbps) Burst 16000 (Bytes)
(pkts matched/bytes matched) 0/0
(total drops/bytes drops) 0/0

Class-map: Video-Control (match-all)
0 packets, 0 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: ip precedence 3
Queueing
Output Queue: Conversation 265
Bandwidth 1840 (kbps)Max Threshold 64 (packets)
(pkts matched/bytes matched) 0/0
(depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 0/0/0

Class-map: Management-Marked (match-all)
20944081 packets, 5287845346 bytes
5 minute offered rate 37000 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: ip precedence 2
Queueing
Output Queue: Conversation 266
Bandwidth 200 (kbps)Max Threshold 64 (packets)
(pkts matched/bytes matched) 19018/4881708
(depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 0/0/0

Class-map: Business-Marked (match-all)
97396867 packets, 38718492227 bytes
5 minute offered rate 1694000 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: ip precedence 1
Queueing
Output Queue: Conversation 267
Bandwidth 7300 (kbps)Max Threshold 64 (packets)
(pkts matched/bytes matched) 1001342/1149468806
(depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 0/0/0

Class-map: class-default (match-any)
708064 packets, 499315018 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: any

G00-7800-01#sh policy-map int fa0/0 inp
FastEthernet0/0

Service-policy input: InVPNTTK

Class-map: SPRemark2 (match-all)
0 packets, 0 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: ip precedence 2
QoS Set
precedence 3
Packets marked 0

Class-map: class-default (match-any)
239556069 packets, 129058341808 bytes
5 minute offered rate 3149000 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: any

G00-7800-01#sh policy-map int fa0/1.127 inp
FastEthernet0/1.127

Service-policy input: FromLAN

Class-map: VVoIP (match-all)
0 packets, 0 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: access-group name Video_VoIP
police:
cir 40500000 bps, bc 1265625 bytes, be 1500 bytes
conformed 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:
transmit
exceeded 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:
drop
violated 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:
drop
conformed 0 bps, exceed 0 bps, violate 0 bps

Class-map: Management (match-any)
41220006 packets, 7802063674 bytes
5 minute offered rate 26000 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: protocol ssh
39522603 packets, 7207967840 bytes
5 minute rate 26000 bps
Match: protocol telnet
5349 packets, 850936 bytes
5 minute rate 0 bps
Match: protocol syslog
625727 packets, 115980273 bytes
5 minute rate 0 bps
Match: protocol ntp
95313 packets, 9071722 bytes
5 minute rate 0 bps
Match: protocol snmp
962468 packets, 467474491 bytes
5 minute rate 0 bps
Match: access-group name TACACS-server
8545 packets, 719054 bytes
5 minute rate 0 bps
QoS Set
precedence 2
Packets marked 41220006

Class-map: Business (match-all)
217813705 packets, 71424022222 bytes
5 minute offered rate 1303000 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: access-group name LocalTraffic
QoS Set
precedence 1
Packets marked 217813709

Class-map: class-default (match-any)
45867169 packets, 7989029279 bytes
5 minute offered rate 129000 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: any
QoS Set
precedence 0
Packets marked 45867171

Since everything looks fine, I  decided to follow up on the top talkers to find out what applications are running.

Cisco VoIP: How to configure Basic Telephony on a Brand new Cisco Call Manager Express (CME )

Posted on Updated on


** Enable Telephony Service

G00-2921-01#conf t
G00-2921-01(config)#telephony-service

** Configure CME source address Read the rest of this entry »

Cisco R&S: Basic DHCP Configuration on a Cisco Router

Posted on Updated on


 

Configure Excluded IPs for the 3 VLANS

ip dhcp excluded-address 10.1.222.250 10.1.222.254
ip dhcp excluded-address 10.1.0.1 10.1.0.100
ip dhcp excluded-address 10.1.0.200 10.1.0.254
ip dhcp excluded-address 10.1.1.250 10.1.1.254 Read the rest of this entry »

Cisco Wireless: How to configure Multiple SSIDs on CISCO AP1141

Posted on Updated on


 

hostname AP00-1141-01

! Enable aaa to use local authentication

aaa new-model

aaa authentication login default local

aaa session-id common Read the rest of this entry »

Cisco R&S: How to configure a Router to be a DNS server

Posted on Updated on


! Enable DNS  on the router

G00-2811-01(config)#ip dns server

! Enable dns spoofing

G00-2811-01(config)#ip dns spoofing

! Enable domain lookup

G00-2811-01(config)#ip domain-lookup

! Configure the external servers

ip name-server 195.5.128.130
ip name-server 195.5.128.137

! (Optional) Configure the domain name

G00-2811-01(config)#ip domain name me.com

! Configure the pool to use the routers sub interface as dns-server

G00-2811-01(config)#ip dhcp pool Guest_Pool
G00-2811-01(dhcp-config)#dns-server 10.1.1.254

! Verify the domain name

G00-2811-01#term mon
G00-2811-01#debug domain

Cisco Wireless: How to configure a named access list to deny traffic from a Visitor Vlan to Internal Resources

Posted on Updated on


 

This is what I am trying to achieve. I would like the Guest Vlan to get access only to the internet. Everything else is banned.

Here is what i have so far: Read the rest of this entry »

Cisco Wireless: How to perform Carrier busy test on cisco AP

Posted on Updated on


 

1141-01#dot11 dot11Radio 0 carrier busy
1141-01#sh dot11 carrier busy

Frequency Carrier Busy %


2412 27
2417 21
2422 23
2427 26
2432 12
2437 21
2442 23
2447 10
2452 18
2457 21
2462 32
2467 32
2472 12 Read the rest of this entry »

Cisco Telepresence: Comparing the Cisco Codec SX20 and Codec 40

Posted on Updated on


Basically, I was trying to compare the two. All the info is available in Cisco.Com but i decided to make a table for easier comparison 🙂

I think i will settle for a C40 though it is twice the amount 🙂 Read the rest of this entry »

Cisco Telepresence: Cisco Video Codecs compared – C40, C60 AND C90.

Posted on Updated on


  Codec C90  Codec C60  Codec C40 
Design Features • One of the best, most powerful codecs available with the ultimate in video and audio quality• 2U high, rack-mountable, with rack mounting solution included• Professional grade connectors

• Unmatched quality and flexibility

• Standards-compliant 1080p solution-compatible with standards-based video without losing features

 

• The next generation HD video collaboration codec• 1U high, rack-mountable, with rack-mounting solution included• Professional-grade connectors

• Unmatched quality and flexibility

• Standards-compliant 1080p solution-compatible with standards-based video without losing features

 

• The next-generation HD video collaboration codec for every team room• 1 rack unit (1RU) high, rack-mountable, with rack-mounting solution included• Professional-grade connectors

• Unmatched quality and flexibility

• Standards-compliant 1080p solution – compatible with standards-based video without losing features

 

Application features •1080p30 HD embeddedMultiSite with Individual Transcoding• Collaborate on virtually anything with 5 simultaneous video inputs• HD Collaboration with 1080p30 and UXGA*

• Limitless integration possibilities

• Ideal for immersive telepresence and collaboration studios, boardrooms, auditoriums, education and telemedicine applications

 

•720p30 HD embedded Cisco TelePresenceMultiSite (MultiSite) with individual transcoding• Collaborate with 3 simultaneous video inputs• HD Collaboration with 1080p30 and UXGA*

• Limitless integration possibilities

• Ideal for team-based collaboration, boardrooms, meeting rooms and industry applications

• 7 video compositors (embedded)

 

• Individualtranscoding embeddedMultiSite**• HD collaboration with resolutions up toWXGA at full frame rate• One button to push (OBTP) to start a meeting

• Ideal for team-based collaboration and industry applications

 

Performance Features • Optimal Definition up to 1080p• H.323/SIP up to 6Mbps point-to-point; up to10Mbps totalMultiSite bandwidth• Connect up to 12 HD sources and 8 microphones directly into the interface

• Full Duplex Audio with high-quality stereo sound

• Full APIs

• Ability to take advantage of Cisco® TelePresence Total Solution Management, transcoded HD MultiSite, recording and streaming, Cisco TelePresence Multiway, and firewall traversal

• Utilizes ClearPath packet loss protection technology for optimal experience

 

• Optimal definition up to 1080p• H.323/SIP up to 6Mbps point-to-point• Up to 10 Mbps total MultiSite bandwidth

• Connect up to 5 HD sources and 4 microphones directly into the interface

• Full duplex audio with high-quality stereo sound

• Full APIs

• Takes advantage of Cisco® TelePresence Total Solution Management, transcoded HD MultiSite, recording and streaming, Cisco TelePresence Multiway technology (Multiway), and firewall traversal

• Utilizes ClearPath packet loss protection technology for optimal experience

 

• Optimal definition up to 1080p• H.323/SIP up to 6Mbps point-to-point• Ability to connect up to three HD sources and two microphones directly into the interface

• Full-duplex audio with high-quality stereo sound

• Full application programming interfaces (APIs)

• Ability to take advantage of Cisco® Total Solution Management, transcoded HD multipoint control unit (MCU), recording and streaming, Multiway, and firewall traversal

• Cisco TelePresence ClearPath packet loss protection technology for optimal experience

• Cisco Unified Communications Manager native support (requires Cisco Unified Communications Manager Version 8.6 or higher)

 

Unit Delivered Complete With: • Videoconferencing codec, wireless remote control, rackmounting rails, LAN cable, power cable • Videoconferencing codec, wireless remote control, rackmounting rails, LAN cable, power cable • Videoconferencing codec, wireless remote control, rack-mounting ears, LAN cable, and power cable
Bandwidth • H.323/SIP up to 6Mbps point-to-point• Up to 10Mbps totalMultiSite bandwidth  • H.323/SIP up to 6Mbps point-to-point• Up to 10Mbps totalMultiSite bandwidth  • H.323/SIP up to 6 Mbps point-to-point
Firewall traversal • Cisco TelePresence Expressway technology• H.460.18 and H.460.19 Firewall Traversal  • Cisco TelePresence Expressway technology• H.460.18 H.460.19 Firewall Traversal  • Cisco Expressway technology• H.460.18 and H.460.19 Firewall Traversal 
Video Standards • H.261, H.263, H.263+, H.264 • H.261, H.263, H.263+, H.264 • H.261, H.263, H.263+, and H.264
Video Features • Native 16:9 Widescreen• Advanced Screen Layouts• Intelligent Video Management

• Local Auto Layout

• 9 embedded individual video compositors – 1 for every output and 1 for every encoder

 

• Native 16:9 Widescreen• Advanced Screen Layouts• Intelligent Video Management

• Local Auto Layout

• 7 embedded individual video compositors – 1 for every output and 1 for every encoder**

 

• Native 16:9 widescreen• Advanced screen layouts• Intelligent video management

• Local auto layout

 

Video Inputs 4 X HDMI Inputs, Supported Formats:• 1920 x 1080@60, 59.94 Hz (1080p60)• 1920 x 1080@50 Hz (1080p50)

• 1920 x 1080@30, 29.97 Hz (1080p30)

• 1920 x 1080@25 Hz (1080p25)

• 1920 x 1080@24, 23.97 Hz (1080p24)

• 1280 x 720@60, 59.94 Hz (720p60)

• 1280 x 720@50 Hz (720p50)

• 720 x 480@60, 59.94 Hz (480p60)

• 640 x 480@60 Hz (480p60)

• 1600 x 1200@50, 60 Hz (UXGA)

• 1280 x 1024@60, 75 Hz (SXGA)

• 1024 x 768@60, 70, 75, 85 Hz (XGA)

• 800 x 600@56, 60, 72, 75, 85 Hz (SVGA)

• 1920 x 1200@50, 60 Hz (WUXGA)

• 1680 x 1050@60 Hz (WSXGA+)

• 1440 X 900@60 Hz (WXGA+)

• 1280 x 768@60 Hz (WXGA)

4 X HD-SDI Inputs, Supported Formats:

• 1920 x 1080@30 Hz (1080p30)

• 1920 x 1080@25 Hz (1080p25)

• 1280 x 720@60 Hz (720p60)

• 1280 x 720@50 Hz (720p50)

• 1280 x 720@30 Hz (720p30)

• 1280 x 720@25 Hz (720p25)

2 X DVI-I Inputs, Supported Formats:

Analog (VGA):

• 1920 x 1080@60 Hz (1080p)

• 1280 x 720@60 Hz (720p)

• 1600 x 1200@60 Hz (UXGA)

• 1280 x 1024@60, 75 Hz (SXGA)

• 1280 x 960@60 Hz

• 1024 x 768@60, 70, 75, 85 Hz (XGA)

• 1920 x 1200@50 Hz (WUXGA)

• 1680 x 1050@60 Hz (WSXGA+)

• 1440 x 900@60 Hz (WXGA+)

• 1280 x 800@60 Hz (WXGA)

• 1280 x 768@60 Hz (WXGA)

Analog (YPbPr):

• 1920 x 1080@60 Hz (1080p60)

• 1920 x 1080@50 Hz (1080p50)

• 1920 x 1080@30 Hz (1080p30)

• 1920 x 1080@25 Hz (1080p25)

• 1280 x 720@60 Hz (720p60)

• 1280 x 720@50 Hz (720p50)

• 1280 x 720@30 Hz (720p30)

• 720 x 576@50 Hz (576p50)

• 720 x 480@60 Hz (w480p60)

Digital (DVI-D):

• Same as HDMI, reference above

2 X YPBPR Inputs (BNC Connectors), Supported Formats:

• Same as DVI-I, Analog (YPbPr), ref. above

1 X S-VIDEO/Composite Input (BNC Connectors):

• PAL/NTSC

• Extended Display Identification Data (EDID)

 

2 X HDMI Inputs, Supported Formats:• 1920 x 1080@60, 59.94 Hz (1080p60)• 1920 x 1080@50 Hz (1080p50)

• 1920 x 1080@30, 29.97 Hz (1080p30)

• 1920 x 1080@25 Hz (1080p25)

• 1920 x 1080@24, 23.97 Hz (1080p24)

• 1280 x 720@60, 59.94 Hz (720p60)

• 1280 x 720@50 Hz (720p50)

• 720 x 480@60, 59.94 Hz (480p60)

• 640 x 480@60 Hz (480p60)

• 1600 x 1200@50, 60 Hz (UXGA)

• 1280 x 1024@60, 75 Hz (SXGA)

• 1024 x 768@60, 70, 75, 85 Hz (XGA)

• 800 x 600@56, 60, 72, 75, 85 Hz (SVGA)

• 1920 x 1200@50, 60 Hz (WUXGA)

• 1680 x 1050@60 Hz (WSXGA+)

• 1440 X 900@60 Hz (WXGA+)

• 1280 x 768@60 Hz (WXGA)

2 X DVI-I Inputs, Supported Formats:

Analog (VGA):

• 1920 x 1080@60 Hz (1080p)

• 1280 x 720@60 Hz (720p)

• 1600 x 1200@60 Hz (UXGA)

• 1280 x 1024@60, 75 Hz (SXGA)

• 1280 x 960@60 Hz

• 1024 x 768@60, 70, 75, 85 Hz (XGA)

• 1920 x 1200@50 Hz (WUXGA)

• 1680 x 1050@60 Hz (WSXGA+)

• 1440 x 900@60 Hz (WXGA+)

• 1280 x 800@60 Hz (WXGA)

• 1280 x 768@60 Hz (WXGA)

Analog (YPbPr):

• 1920 x 1080@60 Hz (1080p60)

• 1920 x 1080@50 Hz (1080p50)

• 1920 x 1080@30 Hz (1080p30)

• 1920 x 1080@25 Hz (1080p25)

• 1280 x 720@60 Hz (720p60)

• 1280 x 720@50 Hz (720p50)

• 1280 x 720@30 Hz (720p30)

• 720 x 576@50 Hz (576p50)

• 720 x 480@60 Hz (w480p60)

Digital (DVI-D):

• 1920 x 1080@60, 59.94 Hz (1080p60)

• 1920 x 1080@50 Hz (1080p50)

• 1920 x 1080@30, 29.97 Hz (1080p30)

• 1920 x 1080@25 Hz (1080p25)

• 1920 x 1080@24, 23.97 Hz (1080p24)

• 1280 x 720@60, 59.94 Hz (720p60)

• 1280 x 720@50 Hz (720p50)

• 720 x 480@60, 59.94 Hz (480p60)

• 640 x 480@60 Hz (480p60)

• 1600 x 1200@50, 60 Hz (UXGA)

• 1280 x 1024@60, 75 Hz (SXGA)

• 1024 x 768@60, 70, 75, 85 Hz (XGA)

• 800 x 600@56, 60, 72, 75, 85 Hz (SVGA)

• 1920 x 1200@50, 60 Hz (WUXGA)

• 1680 x 1050@60 Hz (WSXGA+)

• 1440 X 900@60 Hz (WXGA+)

• 1280 x 768@60 Hz (WXGA)

1 X Composite Input (BNC Connectors)

• PAL/NTSC

• Extended Display Identification Data (EDID)

 

Two HDMI Inputs; Supported Formats:• 1920 x 1080@60 and 59.94 Hz (1080p60)• 1920 x 1080@50 Hz (1080p50)

• 1920 x 1080@30 and 29.97 Hz (1080p30)

• 1920 x 1080@25 Hz (1080p25)

• 1920 x 1080@24 and 23.97 Hz (1080p24)

• 1280 x 720@60 and 59.94 Hz (720p60)

• 1280 x 720@50 Hz (720p50)

• 720 x 480@60 and 59.94 Hz (480p60)

• 640 x 480@60 Hz (480p60)

• 1600 x 1200@50 and 60 Hz (UXGA)

• 1280 x 1024@60 and 75 Hz (SXGA)

• 1024 x 768@60, 70, 75, and 85 Hz (XGA)

• 800 x 600@56, 60, 72, 75, and 85 Hz (SVGA)

• 1920 x 1200@50 and 60 Hz (WUXGA)

• 1680 x 1050@60 Hz (WSXGA+)

• 1440 X 900@60 Hz (WXGA+)

• 1280 x 768@60 Hz (WXGA)

One DVI-I Input; Supported Formats:

Analog (VGA):

• 1920 x 1080@60 Hz (1080p)

• 1280 x 720@60 Hz (720p)

• 1600 x 1200@60 Hz (UXGA)

• 1280 x 1024@60 and 75 Hz (SXGA)

• 1280 x 960@60 Hz

• 1024 x 768@60, 70, 75, and 85 Hz (XGA)

• 1920 x 1200@50 Hz (WUXGA)

• 1680 x 1050@60 Hz (WSXGA+)

• 1440 x 900@60 Hz (WXGA+)

• 1280 x 800@60 Hz (WXGA)

• 1280 x 768@60 Hz (WXGA)

Analog (YPbPr):

• 1920 x 1080@60 Hz (1080p60)

• 1920 x 1080@50 Hz (1080p50)

• 1920 x 1080@30 Hz (1080p30)

• 1920 x 1080@25 Hz (1080p25)

• 1280 x 720@60 Hz (720p60)

• 1280 x 720@50 Hz (720p50)

• 1280 x 720@30 Hz (720p30)

• 720 x 576@50 Hz (576p50)

• 720 x 480@60 Hz (w480p60)

Digital (DVI-D):

• Same as HDMI; reference earlier in the table

One S-Video/Composite Input (BNC Connectors):

• PAL/NTSC

• Extended Display Identification Data (EDID)

 

Video Outputs (5 Outputs) 2 X HDMI Outputs, 2 X DVI-I Outputs, Supported Formats:• 1920 x 1080@60 Hz (1080p60)• 1280 x 720@60 Hz (720p60)

• 1600 x 1200@60 Hz (UXGA)

• 1280 x 1024@60 Hz (SXGA)

• 1024 x 768@60 Hz (XGA)

• 800 x 600@60 Hz (SVGA)

• 640 x 480@60 Hz (VGA)

• 1920 x 1200@60Hz (WUXGA)

• 1360 x 768@60 Hz

• 1366 x 768@60 Hz

• 1280 x 768@60 Hz (WXGA)

• PAL/NTSC

• VESA Monitor Power Management

• Extended Display Identification Data (EDID)

1 X Composite Output (BNC Connector), Supported Formats:

• PAL/NTSC

• VESA Monitor Power Management

 

1 X HDMI Output, 1 X DVI-I Output, Supported Formats:• 1920 x 1080@60 Hz (1080p60)• 1280 x 720@60 Hz (720p60)

• 1600 x 1200@60 Hz (UXGA)

• 1280 x 1024@60 Hz (SXGA)

• 1024 x 768@60 Hz (XGA)

• 800 x 600@60 Hz (SVGA)

• 640 x 480@60 Hz (VGA)

• 1920 x 1200@60Hz (WUXGA)

• 1360 x 768@60 Hz

• 1366 x 768@60 Hz

• 1280 x 768@60 Hz (WXGA)

1 X Composite Output (BNC Connector), Supported Formats:

• PAL/NTSC

• VESA Monitor Power Management Extended Display Identification Data (EDID)

 

One HDMI Output and One DVI-I Output; Supported Formats:• 1920 x 1080@60 Hz (1080p60)• 1920 x 1080@50 Hz (1080p50)

• 1280 x 720@60 Hz (720p60)

• 1280 x 720@50 Hz (720p50)

• 1600 x 1200@60 Hz (UXGA)

• 1280 x 1024@60 Hz (SXGA)

• 1024 x 768@60 Hz (XGA)

• 800 x 600@60 Hz (SVGA)

• 640 x 480@60 Hz (VGA)

• 1920 x 1200@60Hz (WUXGA)

• 1360 x 768@60 Hz

• 1366 x 768@60 Hz

• 1280 x 768@60 Hz (WXGA)

• VESA Monitor Power Management

• EDID

 

Live Video Resolutions (Encode/Decode) • 176 x 144@30 fps (QCIF)• 352 x 288@30 fps (CIF)• 512 x 288@30 fps (w288p)

• 576 x 448@30 fps (448p)

• 768 x 448@30 fps (w448p)

• 704 x 576@30 fps (4CIF)

• 1024 x 576@30 fps (w576p)

• 1280 x 720@30 fps (720p30)

• 1920 x 1080@30 fps (1080p30)**

• 640 x 480@30 fps (VGA)

• 800 x 600@30 fps (SVGA)

• 1024 x 768@30 fps (XGA)

• 1280 x 1024@30 fps (SXGA)

• 1280 x 768@30 fps (WXGA)

• 1440 x 900@30 fps (WXGA+)

• 1680 x 1050@30 fps (WSXGA+)

• 1600 x 1200@30 fps (UXGA)**

• 1920 x 1200@25 fps (WUXGA)**

• 512 x 288@60 fps (w288p60)

• 768 x 448@60 fps (w448p60)

• 1024 x 576@60 fps (w576p60)

• 1280 x 720@60 fps (720p60)**

• 720p30 from 768kbps

• 720p60 from 1152kbps

• 1080p30 from 1472kpbs

 

• 176 x 144@30 fps (QCIF)• 352 x 288@30 fps (CIF)• 512 x 288@30 fps (w288p)

• 576 x 448@30 fps (448p)

• 768 x 448@30 fps (w448p)

• 704 x 576@30 fps (4CIF)

• 1024 x 576@30 fps (w576p)

• 1280 x 720@30 fps (720p30)

• 1920 x 1080@30 fps (1080p30)*

• 640 x 480@30 fps (VGA)

• 800 x 600@30 fps (SVGA)

• 1024 x 768@30 fps (XGA)

• 1280 x 1024@30 fps (SXGA)

• 1280 x 768@30 fps (WXGA)

• 1440 x 900@30 fps (WXGA+)

• 1680 x 1050@30 fps (WSXGA+)

• 1600 x 1200@30 fps (UXGA)*

• 1920 x 1200@25 fps (WUXGA)*

• 512 x 288@60 fps (w288p60)

• 768 x 448@60 fps (w448p60)

• 1024 x 576@60 fps (w576p60)

• 1280 x 720@60 fps (720p60)*

• 720p30 from 768kbps

• 720p60 from 1152kbps

• 1080p30 from 1472kpbs

 

• 176 x 144@30 frames per second (fps) (QCIF)• 352 x 288@30 fps (CIF)• 512 x 288@30 fps (w288p)

• 576 x 448@30 fps (448p)

• 768 x 448@30 fps (w448p)

• 704 x 576@30 fps (4CIF)

• 1024 x 576@30 fps (w576p)

• 1280 x 720@30 fps (720p30)

• 1920 x 1080@30 fps (1080p30)**

• 512 x 288@60 fps (w288p60)

• 768 x 448@60 fps (w448p60)

• 1024 x 576@60 fps (w576p60)

• 1280 x 720@60 fps (720p60)**

• 640 x 480@30 fps (VGA)

• 800 x 600@30 fps (SVGA)

• 1024 x 768@30 fps (XGA)

• 1280 x 768@30 fps (WXGA)

• 720p30 from 768 kbps

• 720p60 from 1152 kbps

• 1080p30 from 1472 kpbs

 

Audio Standards • G.711, G.722, G.722.1, 64 kbps & 128 kbps MPEG4 AAC-LD, AAC-LD Stereo • G.711, G.722, G.722.1,64 kbps & 128 kbps MPEG4 AAC-LD, AAC-LD Stereo • G.711, G.722, G.722.1, 64-bit kbps, and 128-bit kbps MPEG4• AAC-LD and AAC-LD Stereo 
Audio Features • CD-Quality20KHz Mono and Stereo• Eight separate acoustic echocancellers• 8-port Audio mixer

• Automatic Gain Control (AGC)

• Automatic Noise Reduction

• Active lip synchronization

 

• CD-Quality20KHz Mono and Stereo• Four separate acoustic echocancellers• 4-port Audio mixer

• Automatic Gain Control (AGC)

• Automatic Noise Reduction

• Active lip synchronization

 

• CD-quality 20-kHz mono and stereo• Two separate acoustic echocancellers• 2-port audio mixer

• Automatic Gain Control (AGC)

• Automatic noise reduction

• Active lip synchronization

 

Audio Inputs  • 8 x microphone,48V phantom powered,XLR connector each with separate echocancellers and noise reduction, all microphones can be set for balanced line level• 2 x RCA/Phono, Line Level: Stereo PC input• 2 x RCA/Phono, Line Level: Stereo auxiliary/DVD input

• 2 x HDMI, digital: Stereo PC/DVD inputs

 

• 4 x microphone,48V phantom powered,XLR connector each with separate echocancellers and noise reduction, all microphones can be set for balanced line level• 2 x RCA/Phono, Line Level: Stereo PC input, configurable to 2 x RCA/Phono, Line Level: Mono auxiliary/DVD input• 1 x HDMI, digital: Stereo PC/DVD inputs

 

• Two microphones,48V phantom powered,XLR connector, each with separate echocancellers and noise reduction; all microphones can be set for balanced line level• Two RCA/Phono inputs, line level: Stereo PC input, configurable to two RCA/Phono inputs, line level: Mono auxiliary/DVD input• One HDMI, digital: Stereo PC/DVD inputs

 

Audio Outputs • 2 xXLR, balanced line level, stereo main audio• 2 x RCA/Phono, line level, stereo main audio, configurable to S/PDIF• 2 x RCA/Phono, line level, stereo to recording device

• 1 x HDMI, digital, stereo main audio

• 1 x HDMI, digital, stereo to recording device

 

• 2 x RCA/Phono, line level, stereo main audio, configurable to S/PDIF or 2 x RCA/Phono, line level, mono to recording device• 1 x HDMI, digital, stereo main audio  • Two RCA/Phono inputs, line level, stereo main audio, configurable to S/PDIF or two RCA/Phono inputs, line level, mono to recording device• One HDMI, digital, stereo main audio 
Dual Stream • H.239 (H.323) dual stream•BFCP (SIP) dual stream• Available in MultiSite from any site

• Support for resolutions up to 1080p30/WUXGA, independent of main stream resolution

 

• H.239 (H.323) dual stream•BFCP (SIP) dual stream• Support for resolutions up to 1080p30/WUXGA, independent of main stream resolution

 

• H.239 (H.323) dual stream•BFCP (SIP) dual stream• Support for resolutions up to WXGAp30, independent of the main stream resolution

 

MultiSite Features

MultiSite Features
(embedded MultiPoint)
• 4-way1080p30 High Definition SIP/H.323MultiSite• Full individual audio and video transcoding

• Individual layouts in MultiSite CP (takes out self view)

• H.323/SIP/VoIP in the same conference

• Support for Presentation (H.239/BFCP) from any participant at resolutions up to 1080p30/WUXGA

• Best Impression (Automatic CP Layouts)

• H.264, Encryption, Dual Stream from any site

• IP Downspeeding

• Dial in/Dial out

• Additional telephone call (no license required)

• Conference rates up to 10 Mbps

 

MultiSite Features
(embedded MultiPoint)
• 4-way720p30 High Definition SIP/H.323 MultiSite• Full individual audio and video transcoding

• Individual layouts in MultiSite CP (Takes out self view)

• H.323/SIP/VoIP in the same conference

• Support for Presentation (H.239/BFCP) from any participant at resolutions up to WXGAp30

• Best Impression (Automatic CP Layouts)

• H.264, Encryption, Dual Stream from any site

• IP Downspeeding

• Dial in/Dial out

• Additional telephone call (no license required)

• Conference rates up to 10 Mbps

 

MultiSite features
(embedded MultiPoint Switch)
• Four-way SIP/H.323 MultiSite; resolution up tow576p30• Full individual audio and video transcoding

• Individual layouts in multisite continuous presence (takes out self view)

• H.323, SIP, and voice over IP (VoIP) in the same conference

• Support for Presentation (H.239/BFCP) from any participant at resolutions up to WXGAp30

• Best Impression (automatic continuous presence layouts)

• H.264, encryption, and dual stream from any site

• Dial in and dial out

• Additional telephone call (no license required)

• Conference rates up to 10 Mbps

 

Protocols • H.323• SIP  • H.323• SIP  • H.323• SIP 
Embedded Encryption • H.323/SIP point-to-point andmultipoint calls• Standards-based: H.235 v2 &v3 and AES• Automatic key generation and exchange

• Supported in Dual Stream & and MultiSite

 

• H.323/SIP point-to-point• Standards-based: H.235 v2 &v3 and AES• Automatic key generation and exchange

• Supported in Dual Stream

 

• H.323/SIP point-to-point• Standards-based: H.235v3 and Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)• Automatic key generation and exchange

• Supported in Dual Stream

 

IP Network Features • DNS lookup for service configuration• Differentiated Services (QoS)• IP adaptive bandwidth management (including flow control)

• Auto gatekeeper discovery

• Dynamic playout and lip-sync buffering

• H.245 DTMF tones in H.323

• Date and Time support via NTP

• Packet Loss based Downspeeding

• URI Dialing

• TCP/IP

• DHCP

• 802.1x Network authentication

• ClearPath

 

• DNS lookup for service configuration• Differentiated Services (QoS)• IP adaptive bandwidth management (including flow control)

• Auto gatekeeper discovery

• Dynamic playout and lip-sync buffering

• H.245 DTMF tones in H.323

• Date and Time support via NTP

• Packet Loss based Downspeeding

• URI Dialing

• TCP/IP

• DHCP

• 802.1x Network authentication

• ClearPath

 

• DNS lookup for service configuration• Differentiated Services (quality of service [QoS])• IP adaptive bandwidth management (including flow control)

• Auto gatekeeper discovery

• Dynamic playout and lip-sync buffering

• H.245 DTMF tones in H.323

• Date and time support through Network Time Protocol (NTP)

• Packet loss-based downspeeding

• URI dialing

• TCP/IP

• Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)

• 802.1x Network Authentication

• 802.1Q Virtual LAN

• 802.1p (QoS and class of service [CoS])

• ClearPath

 

IPv6 Network Support • Single call stack support for bothH323 and SIP• Dual-stack IPv4 and IPv6 for DHCP, SSH, HTTP, HTTPS, DNS,DiffServ• Support for both Static and Autoconfig (stateless address auto config)

 

• Single call stack support for bothH323 and SIP• Dual-stack IPv4 and IPv6 for DHCP, SSH, HTTP, HTTPS, DNS,DiffServ• Support for both Static and Autoconfig (stateless address auto config)

 

• Single call stack support for bothH323 and SIP• Dual-stack IPv4 and IPv6 for DHCP, Secure Shell (SSH), HTTP, Secure HTTP (HTTPS), DNS, and Differentiated Services (DiffServ)• Support for both static and autoconfiguration (stateless address auto configuration)

 

Cisco Unified Communications Manager(requires Cisco Unified Communications Manager Version 8.6 or later)  • Native registration with Cisco Unified Communications Manager• Basic Cisco Unified Communications Manager provisioning• Firmware upgrade from Cisco Unified Communications Manager

• Cisco Discovery Protocol and DHCP option 150 support

• Basic telephony features such as hold, resume, transfer, and Corporate Directory lookup

 

Security Features • Management via HTTPS and SSH• IP Administration Password• Menu Administration Password

• Disable IP services

• Network Settings protection

 

• Management via HTTPS and SSH• IP Administration Password• Menu Administration Password

• Disable IP services

• Network Settings protection

 

• Management through HTTPS and SSH• IP administration password• Menu administration password

• Disable IP services

• Network settings protection

 

Network Interfaces • 2*** x separate LAN/Ethernet (RJ-45) 10/100/1000 Mbit • 1 x LAN/Ethernet (RJ-45) 10/100/1000 Mbit • Two LAN/Ethernet (RJ-45) 10/100/1000 Mb
Other Interfaces • USB host for future usage• USB device for future usage• GPIO*

 

• USB host for future usage• USB device for future usage• GPIO

 

• USB device for future usage
Cisco TelePresence Precision HD Camera (1080p)  • 1/3″ CMOS• 12 x zoom• +15°/-25° tilt, +/- 90° pan

• 43.5° vertical field of view

• 72° horizontal field of view

• Focus distance 0.3m-infinity

• 1920 x 1080 pixels progressive @ 60fps

• Other formats supported (configurable through Dip-switch):

• 1920×1080@60fps (HDMI only)

• 1920×1080@50fps (HDMI only)

• 1920×1080@30fps

• 1920×1080@25fps

• 1280×720@60fps

• 1280×720@50fps

• 1280×720@30fps

• 1280×720@25fps

• Automatic or manual focus/brightness/whitebalance

• Far-end camera control

• Daisy-chain support (Visca protocol camera)

• Dual HDMI and HD-SDI output

• Upside-down mounting with automatic flipping of picture

 

• 1/3″ CMOS• 12 x zoom• +15°/-25° tilt, +/- 90° pan

• 43.5° vertical field of view

• 72° horizontal field of view

• Focus distance 0.3m-infinity

• 1920 x 1080 pixels progressive @ 60fps

• Other formats supported (configurable through Dip-switch):

• 1920×1080@60fps (HDMI only)

• 1920×1080@50fps (HDMI only)

• 1920×1080@30fps

• 1920×1080@25fps

• 1280×720@60fps

• 1280×720@50fps

• 1280×720@30fps

• 1280×720@25fps

• Automatic or manual focus/brightness/white balance

• Far-end camera control

• Daisy-chain support (Visca protocol camera)

• Dual HDMI and HD-SDI output

• Upside-down mounting with automatic flipping of picture

 

• 1/3-inch CMOS• 12x zoom and 4x zoom• +15°/-25° tilt, +/-90° pan

• 43.5° vertical field of view

• 72° horizontal field of view

• Focus distance 0.3m-infinity

• 1920 x 1080 pixels progressive @ 60 fps (12x version)

• 1920 x 1080 pixels progressive @ 30 fps (4x version)

Other formats supported (configurable through dip-switch):

• 1920 x 1080@60 fps (HDMI only)*

• 1920 x 1080@50 fps (HDMI only)*

• 1920 x 1080@30 fps

• 1920 x 1080@25 fps

• 1280 x 720@60 fps*

• 1280 x 720@50 fps*

• 1280 x 720@30 fps

• 1280 x 720@25 fps

• Automatic or manual focus, brightness, and white balance

• Far-end camera control

• Daisy-chain support (Visca protocol camera)*

• Dual HDMI and HD-SDI outputs

• Upside-down mounting with automatic flipping of picture

 

System Management • Support for the Cisco TelePresence Management Suite• Total management via embeddedSNMP, Telnet, SSH, XML, SOAP• Remote software upload: via web server, SCP, HTTP, HTTPS

• 1 x RS-232 for local control and diagnostics

• Remote control and on-screen menu system

 

• Support for the Cisco TelePresence Management Suite• Total management via embeddedSNMP, Telnet, SSH, XML, SOAP• Remote software upload: via web server, SCP, HTTP, HTTPS

• 1 x RS-232 for local control and diagnostics

• Remote control and on-screen menu system

 

• Support for the Cisco TelePresence Management Suite (Cisco TMS)• Total management through embedded Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), Telnet, SSH, XML, and Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP)• Remote software upload: Through web server, Secure Copy (SCP), HTTP, and HTTPS

• One RS-232 for local control and diagnostics

• Remote control and on-screen menu system

 

Directory Services • Support for Local directories (My Contacts)• Corporate Directory• Unlimited entries using Server directory supporting

• LDAP and H.350

• Unlimited number for Corporate directory (through Cisco TelePresence Management Suite)

• 200 number local directory

• Received Calls

• Placed Calls

• Missed Calls with Date and Time

 

• Support for Local directories (My Contacts)• Corporate Directory• Unlimited entries using Server directory supporting

• LDAP and H.350

• Unlimited number for Corporate directory (through Cisco TelePresence Management Suite)

• 200 number local directory

• Received Calls

• Placed Calls

• Missed Calls with Date and Time

 

• Support for local directories (My Contacts)• Corporate Directory• Unlimited entries using server directory supporting LDAP and H.350 (requires Cisco TelePresence Management Suite)

• Unlimited number for Corporate Directory (through Cisco TelePresence Management Suite)

• 200 number local directory

• Received calls

• Placed calls

• Missed calls with date and time

 

Power • Auto-sensing power supply• 100-240VAC, 50/60 Hz• 175 watts max. for codec and main camera

 

• Auto-sensing power supply• 100-240VAC, 50/60 Hz• 175 watts max. for codec and main camera

 

• Auto-sensing power supply• 100-240VAC, 50-60 Hz• 175 watts maximum for codec and main camera

 

Operating Temperature and Humidity • 0° C to 35° C (32° F to 95° F) ambient temperature• 10% to 90% Relative Humidity (RH)  • 0° C to 35° C (32° F to 95° F) ambient temperature• 10% to 90% Relative Humidity (RH)  • 32 to 95°F (0 to 35°C) ambient temperature• 10 to 90% relative humidity (RH) 
Storage and Transport Temperature • -20° C to 60° C (-4° F to 140° F) at RH 10-90% (non-condensing) • -20° C to 60° C (-4° F to 140° F) at RH 10-90% (non-condensing) • -4 to 140°F (-20 to 60°C) at RH 10-90% (noncondensing)
Dimensions • Length: 17.36″/44.1 cm• Height: 3.67″/9.3 cm• Depth: 11.8″/30 cm

• Weight: 11.22 lbs/5.1 kg

 

• Length: 17.4″/44.2 cm• Height: 1.7″/4.4 cm• Depth: 10.9″/27.8 cm

• Weight: 8.8 lbs/4 kg

 

• Length: 17.4 in. (44.2 cm)• Height: 1.7 in. (4.4 cm)• Depth: 10.9 in. (27.8 cm)

• Weight: 8.8 lb (4 kg)

 

 

Cisco VoIP: Troubleshooting IP Phone Registration

Posted on Updated on


1) Check DHCP configuration (option 150)
2) Check flash for firmware
3) Check tftp server command for files required

Read the rest of this entry »

Cisco R&S: Attributes used by BGP in route selection

Posted on Updated on


1) Nexthop – Should be accessible, otherwise, drop.

2) Largest Weight. Not part of the routing update.

3) Largest Local Preference. Prefered path to a remote destination. Part of the routing update. Default is 100. Local to the AS. Read the rest of this entry »

Cisco R&S: Verification Commands for BGP

Posted on Updated on


#sh ip bgp – entries in BGP routing table

#sh ip bgp neighbors – BGP and TCP connections to neighbors

#sh ip bgp rib-failure – networks that are not installed in the RIB and reason why Read the rest of this entry »

Cisco R&S: Frequent commands used when configuring BGP

Posted on Updated on


#router bgp 100 –  only one BGP process per router

#network x.x.x.x mask x.x.x.x – using this command will not automatically form a neighbor relationship

#neighbor x.x.x.x remote-as x.x.x.x – peer router Read the rest of this entry »